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Full Version: Where Is the Compassion for Chronic Pain Patients?
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I've been watching the "Opioid Crisis" for about 5 years. It's amazing how the medical industry has swung from prescribing opioids for just about any ache or pain to cutting off long-time patients who have a serious need for some type of pain control -- even those who weren't abusing their prescriptions or showing any sign of addiction.

As an observer on the inside of the kratom movement, it is clear that the growth in the use of kratom was largely motivated by the desire by many who found themselves dependent on legitimately prescribed opioids, who wanted a safe, convenient, and effective way to get OFF these over-promoted painkillers -- and they didn't find the conventional path (via pain clinics and/or rehab facilities) to be a good way to do it.

To my mind, the popularity of kratom among chronic pain patients seems to be evidence of "American ingenuity" being applied to better solving the pathetic failure rate of the drug rehab industry, outside the conventional Medically Assisted Therapy, which plainly consists of switching the patient's dependence to methadone or suboxone, for instance, from an addiction or dependence on oxycodone, heroin, or some other opioid. As long as the spending keeps flowing back to Big Pharma's products (no matter how miserable and habituated the patient is), the medical system is happy.

Now that kratom is letting patients get free of opioids at home, with the encouragement of friends, and at great savings to insurance and Medicare/Medicaid -- or their own limited cash -- the FDA and DEA have come to the rescue of Big Pharma's profits, with their recent efforts to ban kratom as "dangerous and highly addictive". 

There is no appreciation by the FDA of the successes in reversing addiction to opioids -- or the savings to society in terms of cash and lives saved -- by kratom.

The FDA and DEA only see the relatively few individuals who abuse kratom, often together with other substances, just as they formerly abused opioids. They choose not to see any of the good that kratom is making possible for the millions who consume it responsibly and with good information on how to take it and where to obtain the pure leaf.

If we are to find new, better solutions to medical problems, I believe we need to be open to traditional herbal approaches. To force the public to only rely on a failed paradigm of pharmaceutical remedies for problems that industry created seems a guaranteed recipe for more misery for patients and more profits for Big Pharma. 

Aren't patients to have any say in which form of treatment they prefer?
Wow,

This a great place to start when trying to understand how/why Kratom has gained popularity so quickly and the ear and the eye of the media. I believe that Kratom could easily be a huge part of the future of pain control. Big Pharma SHOULD be inclined to join hands with large Kratom processors who shall not be named.
The FDA appears to have had to trump up concerns, or should I say magnify concerns to a level of panic, but why? There must be some other driving force motivating the persecution of Kratom. Some can speculate that there is more money in opiate medication and opiate addicted populations, than there is in a mild and natural treatment like Kratom that appears to me more effective for many than other traditional methods.

I know that my Dr. wanted to prescribe opiate based medication to assist me in a time of pain and had to refer me to pain clinic. He tried to write the script but he Pharmacy looked at my script and told me they couldn't fill it. I asked why and they told me it wasn't time to yet. I assured them I was in pain and needed the medication and that my Dr. agreed and that's why he wrote the script. I actually had a moment of anger when the pharmacist called me an opiate abuser in the Large Chain Grocery store pharmacy. One could ask if Doctors have any say in the form of treatment either. It appears that the pharmacy and the DEA are in control. How can someone say that pain sufferers are not treated as criminals if the DEA monitors all opiate based medication prescriptions.
@designerkratom: thats none of the pharmacist business!! their job is to fill the script.not ask questions.

kratom should even be used in detox clinics as well. give people the option to do a rapid detox with their choice, cold turkey, methadone, subs or kratom.

the answer is simple IMO. pharma doesn't want this alternative on the market

my holistic doctor last year was telling me how certain medical boards were trying to shut down holistic treatment centers. not kratom related. they were pushing for hard regulations and restrictions against them.

its amazing to me that traditional doctors going through med school are not taught both conventional and holistic treatments
I know a pain clinic counselor very well who uses Kratom. I asked what she thought of it as an aid to assist patients and she said she wishes she could incorporate into her counseling, but her hands are tied. I imagine it would be a financial conflict of interest for her to treat her patients to sobriety so they could leave the clinic on their own accord.
(05-11-2018, 10:43 PM)designerkratom Wrote: [ -> ]I know a pain clinic counselor very well who uses Kratom.  I asked what she thought of it as an aid to assist patients and she said she wishes she could incorporate into her counseling, but her hands are tied.  I imagine it would be a financial conflict of interest for her to treat her patients to sobriety so they could leave the clinic on their own accord.

yeah, probably not a good idea from a legality standpoint. not at this time. kratom would need to go through extensive studies probably for 20 years before ever being approved if at all for any treatments like all other medicines
in 20 years, we will have found new and better methods and down-talking mitragyna speciosa as primitive and less than ideal for treatment.
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As Goldman Sachs said at a pharma development and investment conference last week curing a disease is not ideal even if it is better for the patient and society as a whole it is not good for profits or the company.
(05-12-2018, 01:28 AM)RoninAdvocacy Wrote: [ -> ]As Goldman Sachs said at a pharma development and investment conference last week curing a disease is not ideal even if it is better for the patient and society as a whole it is not good for profits or the company.

sounds about right  Screaming